Fit mum Sophie Guidolin, 31, reveals the seven ways to lose weight this summer


A personal trainer and fit mother has revealed the seven ways to lose weight this summer, and the S.M.A.R.T technique she swears by for achieving her goals. 

Sophie Guidolin, 31, from Queensland, said there are many misconceptions around weight loss and many people assume that more cardio and less food are the answer, but this is simply not the case.

‘Not only is this an unsustainable lifestyle, but it could deeply affect your health,’ Sophie wrote on her website.  

A personal trainer and fit mother has revealed the seven ways to lose weight this summer, and the S.M.A.R.T technique she swears by for achieving her goals (Sophie Guidolin pictured)

Sophie (pictured) said you need to set S.M.A.R.T goals, which stands for specific, measurable, achievable, realistic and timely

Sophie (pictured) said you need to set S.M.A.R.T goals, which stands for specific, measurable, achievable, realistic and timely

1. Set a realistic goal

The first thing Sophie said you should do for summer weight loss is take the time to write

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The Health 202: Coronavirus survival rates in the United States haven’t improved since the summer


“It’s been rock solid stable since July, around 1.7 percent,” said David Dowdy, an associate professor at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. “If anything, I think there is a concern it will go up again because we’re seeing hospitals reaching their capacity.”

Treatments have improved survival rates incrementally.

There’s no doubt health providers have discovered best practices for treating seriously ill covid-19 patients since the onset of the pandemic, along with some new therapeutics. In the past two weeks the Food and Drug Administration has given emergency approval to two monoclonal antibody treatments, one from Eli Lilly and another from Regeneron Pharmaceuticals. 

The treatments are designed to prevent infected people from developing severe illness by imitating the body’s natural defenses. They’re given to non-hospitalized patients, typically those who are at increased risk for severe illness due to either age or an underlying condition. President Trump received monoclonal

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Short bursts of intense exercise could help people get fit in time for summer


Short bursts of intense exercise – known as HIIT – could help you get back into shape by summer and stay that way, a UNSW Sydney exercise physiology researcher says.

Short bursts of intense exercise could help people get fit in time for summer

Running up an incline like a staircase is one example of doing HIIT – high-intensity interval training. UNSW Medicine researcher Dr Andrew Keech runs uphill near his home and says it’s a great, efficient way to keep fit. Photo: Shutterstock

Getting fit by exercising intensely for a few minutes a day, several times a week, might sound too good to be true if COVID-19 lockdown has left you with an expanded waistline.

And with the coming and going of exercise trends with catchy names and celebrity endorsements, it would be easy to dismiss high-intensity interval training (HIIT) as just another fad.

But it’s far from it and could be your answer to getting back into shape in

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After Summer Increases, California, Texas and Florida Brace for New Surge


Despite a temporary reprieve following record-setting surges over the summer, three of the most highly populated U.S. states are contending with swelling coronavirus cases and hospitalizations at levels not seen in months.

Texas, California and Florida are among the 47 states and Washington, D.C., where cases were rising at a faster pace over the past seven days than during the week prior, according to a Wall Street Journal analysis of Johns Hopkins University data. Last week, Texas hit one million total confirmed cases since the pandemic began. Just days later, California reached the same milestone. Florida has recorded more than 885,000, the third highest among U.S. states.

The spread of the coronavirus in these former hot spots is currently accelerating at a slower pace than in states like Wyoming, Utah, Michigan and Minnesota. But upticks in new cases and hospitalizations show increased spread at a record-breaking point in the pandemic

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