Joint pain supplement reduces premature death risk as effectively as exercise, study suggests


Watch: Glucosamine-chondroitin supplement may ward off early death

A daily glucosamine-chondroitin supplement may be as effective as exercise when it comes to warding off an early death, research suggests.

Working up a sweat has known benefits, with regular physical activity up to halving the risk of heart disease, type 2 diabetes and cancer, to name a few conditions.

Glucosamine and chondroitin are naturally-occurring substances found in cartilage. The two compounds are often combined in over-the-counter supplements that are marketed to ease joint pain or osteoarthritis.

After examining the supplement intake of more than 16,000 adults, scientists from West Virginia University found those who took a glucosamine-chondroitin supplement every day for at least 12 months were 39% less likely to die from any cause over the next eight years.

Read more:Exceed exercise recommendations to offset prolonged sitting

Results further suggested the daily pill cut the risk of heart disease deaths

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Feeling Sore After Exercise? Here’s What Science Suggests Helps (And What Doesn’t)


The Conversation

Have you been hitting the gym again with COVID restrictions easing? Or getting back into running, cycling, or playing team sports?

As many of you might’ve experienced, the inevitable muscle soreness that comes after a break can be a tough barrier to overcome.

Here’s what causes this muscle soreness, and how best to manage it.

 

What is muscle soreness and why does it occur?

Some muscle soreness after a workout is normal. But it can be debilitating and deter you from further exercise. The scientific term used to describe these aches is delayed onset muscle soreness, or DOMS, which results from mechanical disruption of the muscle fibres, often called “microtears”.

This damage causes swelling and inflammation in the muscle fibres, and the release of substances that sensitise the nerves within the muscle, producing pain when the muscle contracts or is stretched.

This pain usually peaks 24-72 hours after exercise. The

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Feeling sore after exercise? Here’s what science suggests helps (and what doesn’t)


Have you been hitting the gym again with COVID restrictions easing? Or getting back into running, cycling, or playing team sports?

As many of you might’ve experienced, the inevitable muscle soreness that comes after a break can be a tough barrier to overcome.

Here’s what causes this muscle soreness, and how best to manage it.

What is muscle soreness and why does it occur?

Some muscle soreness after a workout is normal. But it can be debilitating and deter you from further exercise. The scientific term used to describe these aches is delayed onset muscle soreness, or DOMS, which results from mechanical disruption of the muscle fibres, often called “microtears”.

This damage causes swelling and inflammation in the muscle fibres, and the release of substances that sensitise the nerves within the muscle, producing pain when the muscle contracts or is stretched.

This pain usually peaks 24-72 hours after exercise. The

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Glucosamine may reduce overall death rates as effectively as regular exercise, study suggests — ScienceDaily


Glucosamine supplements may reduce overall mortality about as well as regular exercise does, according to a new epidemiological study from West Virginia University.

“Does this mean that if you get off work at five o’clock one day, you should just skip the gym, take a glucosamine pill and go home instead?” said Dana King, professor and chair of the Department of Family Medicine, who led the study. “That’s not what we suggest. Keep exercising, but the thought that taking a pill would also be beneficial is intriguing.”

He and his research partner, Jun Xiang — a WVU health data analyst — assessed data from 16,686 adults who completed the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey from 1999 to 2010. All of the participants were at least 40 years old. King and Xiang merged these data with 2015 mortality figures.

After controlling for various factors — such as participants’ age, sex,

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Louisiana’s lung cancer survival rate suggests it may often go undetected | Health care/Hospitals


Louisiana residents who get lung cancer are more likely to die from it than people in almost any other state, a statistic researchers say might have as much to do with Louisiana’s dismal record for detecting the disease as with its high rates of smoking and pollution.

The American Lung Association said in a report this month that Louisiana’s survival rate for lung cancer after five years is 18.1%, meaning that more than four in five residents who get the disease quickly succumb to it. Only Mississippi and Alabama are worse off than Louisiana among the 47 states that provided data. The average U.S. survival rate is 22.6%.



112020 U.S. lung cancer rates

Lung cancer has one of the lowest five-year survival rates because cases are often diagnosed at later stages when it is less likely to be curable. Louisiana has one of the worst survival rates in the nation (45th out of 47 states

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Newsom suggests when mass vaccination could be available in California


With three COVID-19 vaccines now showing promising results, California Gov. Gavin Newsom said at a Monday press conference the state is preparing for delivery and distribution, but widespread availability to the public is still months away.

As Newsom has said before, he noted the state’s health care workers will be the first in line to receive inoculations and this could happen before the end of the year.

“Mass vaccination is unlikely to occur any time soon,” Newsom said. “March, April, June, July, that’s where we start to scale.”

The Food and Drug Administration is likely to approve one or more vaccines in early December, and Newsom said the state is ready to act quickly with the wheels already in motion.


California launched a community advisory committee of community groups, school leaders and nonprofit organizations to advise on distribution and allocation. A draft of the Phase 1a allocation, targeting 2.4 million

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Early Research Suggests That Masks Don’t Hinder Your Fitness Performance




a person riding on the back of a bicycle: A new study shows that working out while wearing a mask won’t sabotage your fitness goals.


© Natalie R. Starr
A new study shows that working out while wearing a mask won’t sabotage your fitness goals.

  • As the coronavirus continues to spread across the country, more cities and states are adopting mask mandates.
  • Many gyms and indoor training facilities require masks when working out to help slow the spread of coronavirus and COVID-19.
  • A new study published in the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health found that wearing a mask does not hinder performance or oxygen levels.

Though gyms and fitness studios have slowly reopened, that doesn’t mean the spread of coronavirus is under control. To help mitigate the spread, many gyms and indoor training facilities require clients to wear masks or face coverings. The good news: Early research suggests they don’t actually hinder your performance in terms of time to exhaustion or peak power output, and had no discernible negative effect on

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Study suggests insomnia is persistent more often than situational


Tossing, turning and can’t fall asleep? The answer isn’t waiting it out — it’s getting help so your insomnia doesn’t persist, a new Canadian study shows.

Among more than 3,000 adults followed for five years, researchers found that 37.5% of those who started the study with insomnia still had it five years later. The persistence of that insomnia was higher in those who had worse insomnia at the beginning.

They also discovered that nearly 14% of participants who had no insomnia to start developed insomnia by their five-year follow-up.

“We know that when insomnia persists all the time, that it may be associated with a number of negative health outcomes,” said study author Charles Morin, a professor of psychology at Laval University in Quebec City.

Insomnia can include trouble falling asleep or staying asleep during the night, or waking up too early in the morning.

The researchers wanted to document

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