Joint pain supplement reduces premature death risk as effectively as exercise, study suggests


Watch: Glucosamine-chondroitin supplement may ward off early death

A daily glucosamine-chondroitin supplement may be as effective as exercise when it comes to warding off an early death, research suggests.

Working up a sweat has known benefits, with regular physical activity up to halving the risk of heart disease, type 2 diabetes and cancer, to name a few conditions.

Glucosamine and chondroitin are naturally-occurring substances found in cartilage. The two compounds are often combined in over-the-counter supplements that are marketed to ease joint pain or osteoarthritis.

After examining the supplement intake of more than 16,000 adults, scientists from West Virginia University found those who took a glucosamine-chondroitin supplement every day for at least 12 months were 39% less likely to die from any cause over the next eight years.

Read more:Exceed exercise recommendations to offset prolonged sitting

Results further suggested the daily pill cut the risk of heart disease deaths

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Major problems with viral story about Johns Hopkins ‘study’ on COVID-19 deaths


Sweeping the right-wing media ecosystem, amplified by massively viral tweets, is the claim that Johns Hopkins released — and quickly deleted — a study showing COVID-19 hasn’t led to an increase in deaths in the U.S. this year.

It’s being used to justify false narratives that the pandemic isn’t deadly and that lockdowns are tyrannical overreach by state governments. One often-linked write-up on PJ Media, a right-wing political site, describes the story thusly:

“According to the study, ‘in contrast to most people’s assumptions, the number of deaths by COVID-19 is not alarming. In fact, it has relatively no effect on deaths in the United States.’ Wait, what? Really? That’s what it says. And, it should come as no surprise that the study was deleted within days.”

There are, however, major issues with this so-called study.


For one, calling it a “Johns Hopkins study” is inaccurate. The now-broken URL didn’t

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Relief for unemployed in U.S. could be crucial for health, study says


Americans who lost their jobs this year due to the coronavirus pandemic have remained healthier and more secure thanks to expanded unemployment insurance, a new study reports.

Struggling folks who received benefits reported that they were less likely to go hungry, miss a rent or mortgage payment, delay needed medical care, or suffer from anxiety or depression, according to the findings.

“These programs are doing what they’re meant to do. They’re helping to buffer the economic disruption that’s coming from the pandemic,” said lead researcher Dr. Seth Berkowitz, a professor with the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

A bipartisan group of U.S. Senators on Tuesday introduced a $908 billion stimulus proposal that would provide $300 a week in federal unemployment benefits for four months, offering additional relief to tens of millions of jobless Americans.

This study shows why extending unemployment benefits would serve as a powerful weapon in

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A Harvard Study Has Found How 12 Minutes of Exercise Can Boost Fat-Burning Metabolites


The sad reality of wanting to stay healthy is that not all of us can spare an hour a day for exercise. Often, living room workouts, garden WODs and kitchen mobility sessions are squeezed into lunch breaks or as a quick blast when our schedule permits. Even during a time when most of us are spending more hours at home, finding the minutes to get a sweat on is a challenge in itself, never mind the actual workout.

However, if a new Harvard-affiliated research paper by Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) is to be believed, short workouts will no longer equate to a failed workout.

As detailed in a paper published in Circulation, the research team found that approximately 12 minutes of cardiopulmonary exercise was enough to affect around 80 per cent of circulating metabolites — the substance that’s necessary for a functioning metabolism — as well as various biological pathways

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Study: Air pollution exposure may be linked to Alzheimer’s disease risk


Older adults exposed to air pollution might have a heightened risk of abnormal “plaque” accumulation in the brain, a new study suggests.

Plaques refer to clumps of protein called beta-amyloid that build up in the brains of people with Alzheimer’s disease.

In the new study, researchers found that among older adults with memory and thinking problems, those exposed to higher levels of air pollution were more likely to show plaque buildup on brain scans.

The findings do not prove air pollution causes plaques or dementia, said lead researcher Leonardo Iaccarino, a postdoctoral fellow at the University of California, San Francisco’s Memory and Aging Center.

But the results add to a body of research suggesting that air pollution is a risk factor for dementia.

A recent study, for example, found that older Americans living in polluted ZIP codes had higher odds of being hospitalized for dementia or Parkinson’s disease than people

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Glucosamine may reduce overall death rates as effectively as regular exercise, study suggests — ScienceDaily


Glucosamine supplements may reduce overall mortality about as well as regular exercise does, according to a new epidemiological study from West Virginia University.

“Does this mean that if you get off work at five o’clock one day, you should just skip the gym, take a glucosamine pill and go home instead?” said Dana King, professor and chair of the Department of Family Medicine, who led the study. “That’s not what we suggest. Keep exercising, but the thought that taking a pill would also be beneficial is intriguing.”

He and his research partner, Jun Xiang — a WVU health data analyst — assessed data from 16,686 adults who completed the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey from 1999 to 2010. All of the participants were at least 40 years old. King and Xiang merged these data with 2015 mortality figures.

After controlling for various factors — such as participants’ age, sex,

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Glucosamine supplements may reduce overall mortality similar to regular exercise, shows study


Glucosamine supplements may reduce overall mortality about as well as regular exercise does, according to a new epidemiological study from West Virginia University.

Does this mean that if you get off work at five o’clock one day, you should just skip the gym, take a glucosamine pill and go home instead?. That’s not what we suggest. Keep exercising, but the thought that taking a pill would also be beneficial is intriguing.”


Dana King, Study Lead, Professor, and Chair, Department of Family Medicine, West Virginia University

He and his research partner, Jun Xiang–a WVU health data analyst–assessed data from 16,686 adults who completed the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey from 1999 to 2010. All of the participants were at least 40 years old. King and Xiang merged these data with 2015 mortality figures.

After controlling for various factors–such as participants’ age, sex, smoking status and

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A new study found coronavirus may have been in the US in December. That doesn’t mean you’ll ever know if you had it then


A new study published Monday suggests the novel coronavirus was infecting people across the US as early as December — a month before the first person known to have been infected with coronavirus arrived in the US from China on January 15.



a person sitting on a bed: A lab technician sorts blood samples inside a lab for a COVID-19 vaccine study at the Research Centers of America (RCA) in Hollywood, Florida, on August 13, 2020.


© Chandan Khanna/AFP/Getty Images
A lab technician sorts blood samples inside a lab for a COVID-19 vaccine study at the Research Centers of America (RCA) in Hollywood, Florida, on August 13, 2020.

Researchers screened blood donations made in December and early January and found evidence of antibodies to the novel coronavirus in at least 84 samples from nine states — something that would suggest those people had been infected with coronavirus.

“These findings suggest that SARS-CoV-2 may have been introduced into the United States prior to January 19, 2020,” the researchers at the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Red Cross wrote in the

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A low-fat, high-carb vegan diet could speed up your metabolism and boost weight loss, a new study says




a plate of food on a table: Crystal Cox/Business Insider


© Crystal Cox/Business Insider
Crystal Cox/Business Insider

  • A low-fat, vegan diet could help with weight loss by speeding up metabolism and naturally reducing calorie intake, according to a new study. 
  • Researchers found that participants on the diet burned 14% more calories after meals, since the high-carb, high-fiber meals took more energy to digest.
  • The diet was also shown to improve insulin sensitivity, reducing risk of diabetes, as participants lost a an average of 13 pounds and a significant amount of body fat.
  • Visit Insider’s homepage for more stories.

A low-fat, high-carb vegan diet could speed weight loss by increasing the calories you burn after eating, without having to exercise.

Researchers from the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine and Yale School of Medicine studied 244 overweight adults during a 16 week diet. Half of the group was randomly assigned to follow a low-fat vegan diet, and was provided with cooking

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Coronavirus likely in US as early as December 2019: Study


The coronavirus may have been present in the United States weeks earlier than scientists realized, according to new government research.



a person standing in a room: A nurse dons personal protective equipment (PPE) as she prepares to enter the room of a COVID-19 patient being treated at UW Health University Hospital in Madison, Wis., on Nov. 18, 2020.


© Daniel Acker/Reuters
A nurse dons personal protective equipment (PPE) as she prepares to enter the room of a COVID-19 patient being treated at UW Health University Hospital in Madison, Wis., on Nov. 18, 2020.

While COVID-19 cases were first identified in China in December, the United States did not report its first case until late January.

A study published in the journal Clinical Infectious Diseases Monday suggests that the virus was present in the United States as early as last December.

To come to that conclusion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention scientists analyzed American Red Cross blood donations collected between Dec. 13, 2019, and Jan. 17, 2020, and found evidence of coronavirus antibodies in 106 out of 7,389 blood donations.

MORE: 4 months after Dr. Fauci’s prediction, US

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