EU stops short of advising against holiday travel over virus


BRUSSELS (AP) — As millions of European citizens gear up for the festive season, the European Union’s executive commission urged member countries to keep strong anti-COVID 19 restrictions in place to avoid a post-holiday surge of coronavirus cases and deaths but stopped short of advising against travel.

The European Commission said in non-binding recommendations published Wednesday that easing pandemic-containment measures this month would jeopardize the efforts that have helped slow infections across the EU in recent weeks.

According to predictions made by the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control, lifting all anti-coronavirus restrictions on Dec. 21 would result in “a subsequent increase in COVID-19 hospital admissions…as early as the first week of January 2021.”

New confirmed cases are falling steadily across Europe, where more than 300,000 people with COVID-19 have died. Until vaccines against the virus are rolled out, the EU commission is recommending prudence.


“Every 17 seconds a

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Metabolic Health | Benefits of Short Bursts of Activity


  • According to new research published in the journal Circulation, short bursts of activity, as little as 12 minutes, can improve your metabolic health.
  • You don’t necessarily have to go full-out to get these health benefits, either. You can start your rides or workouts easy and gradually build up the intensity.

    Let’s say you’re looking to improve your metabolic health—a.k.a., your normal blood sugar, triglyceride, HDL (good) cholesterol, and blood pressure numbers—so you hop on your bike. How long do you need to ride before you kickstart those benefits?

    A new study published in the journal Circulation suggests it may be shorter than you think.

    Sign up for Bicycling All Access to become a stronger, healthier rider!

    Researchers drew on data from the Framingham Heart Study on 411 middle-aged men and women, looking at levels of 588 circulating metabolites—substances produced during metabolism, such as amino acids, fatty acids, lipids, carbohydrates,

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    Hospitals around the U.S. are short of staff, with little relief in sight.


    Coronavirus patients are swamping U.S. hospitals in record numbers, straining the health care system much more widely than the first acute outbreaks did in the spring.

    The total number of patients in hospitals with Covid-19 nationally has hit new highs every day since Nov. 11, when hospitalizations first exceeded the April peak. There were nearly 84,000 on Sunday, according to the Covid Tracking Project.

    The surge comes as the Thanksgiving and the December holidays approach, when travel and family visits are expected to accelerate the spread of the virus and further strain hospitals.

    With a week of November left to go, the United States has already had its highest monthly case total, reporting more than 3,075,000 new coronavirus cases since Nov. 1, according to a New York Times database. By the time the month is over, the tally could top four million, more than double the number in October.

    November’s

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    COVID-19: A Fifth of U.S. Hospitals Are Short on Staff


    As a rule of thumb, the COVID Tracking Project has found that an increase in cases shows up as an increase in hospitalizations about 12 days later. Over the past 12 days, the seven-day average for new cases has jumped from fewer than 90,000 a day to 150,000 a day. While we’ve been able to track the number of people hospitalized with COVID-19 since March, we have not known how many new people were being admitted to hospitals each day, perhaps the best indicator of surging infections. But yesterday, HHS released this data going back to mid-July. At the peak of the summer surge, the seven-day average of daily admissions topped 5,000. Yesterday, the same measure topped 10,000. We should expect many more hospitalizations, and even worse staffing shortages, to come.

    Even if a state has open hospital beds, it may not have

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    Some places were short on nurses before the virus. The pandemic is making it much worse.


    “Our nurses are working longer shifts, a majority are picking up extra shifts, and we’re still short-staffed,” McKamey said, attributing the crisis in part to a hospital policy of reducing personnel in recent years. “We are taking on more patients than what we can really handle and what our patients deserve.”

    As the virus stampedes across the country, setting previously unimaginable infection records nearly every day of its third major surge, some hospitals are desperately searching for staffers and paying dearly for it.

    There is record demand for travel nurses, who take out-of-town assignments on short-term contracts of 13 weeks or less at elevated wages. Per-diem nurses, who are willing to take a shift or two in their local hospitals, have been pressed into service. The military is chipping in.

    And still, in some places, it is not nearly enough.

    “This is a disaster everywhere. This is outstripping capacity in

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    Short exercise bursts produce “striking” effects on metabolic health


    That regular exercise promotes good health is a given, but lately scientists are beginning to unearth some of the intricate mechanisms behind this relationship. A new study has shone a light on short bursts of vigorous exercise specifically, finding that they can produce “striking” effects on the metabolites circulating through the body and by extension lead to improvements in a wide range of bodily functions.

    From boosting the body’s ability to attack cancer, to enhancing learning, and protecting against Alzheimer’s and dementia, recent research is continuing to show us just how far-reaching the benefits of regular exercise can be. The new study carried out by scientists at Massachusetts General Hospital sought to explore how it affects metabolic function, and the knock-on effects of health more generally.

    “Much is known about the effects of exercise on cardiac, vascular and inflammatory systems of the body, but our study provides a comprehensive look

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    Short bursts of intense exercise could help people get fit in time for summer


    Short bursts of intense exercise – known as HIIT – could help you get back into shape by summer and stay that way, a UNSW Sydney exercise physiology researcher says.

    Short bursts of intense exercise could help people get fit in time for summer

    Running up an incline like a staircase is one example of doing HIIT – high-intensity interval training. UNSW Medicine researcher Dr Andrew Keech runs uphill near his home and says it’s a great, efficient way to keep fit. Photo: Shutterstock

    Getting fit by exercising intensely for a few minutes a day, several times a week, might sound too good to be true if COVID-19 lockdown has left you with an expanded waistline.

    And with the coming and going of exercise trends with catchy names and celebrity endorsements, it would be easy to dismiss high-intensity interval training (HIIT) as just another fad.

    But it’s far from it and could be your answer to getting back into shape in

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    Short bursts of exercise elicit widespread changes in the body’s levels of metabolites


    Short bursts of physical exercise induce changes in the body’s levels of metabolites that correlate to, and may help gauge, an individual’s cardiometabolic, cardiovascular and long-term health, a study by Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) has found. In a paper published in Circulation, the research team describes how approximately 12 minutes of acute cardiopulmonary exercise impacted more than 80% of circulating metabolites, including pathways linked to a wide range of favorable health outcomes, thus identifying potential mechanisms that could contribute to a better understanding of cardiometabolic benefits of exercise.

    Much is known about the effects of exercise on cardiac, vascular and inflammatory systems of the body, but our study provides a comprehensive look at the metabolic impact of exercise by linking specific metabolic pathways to exercise response variables and long-term health outcomes. What was striking to us was the effects a

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    Short sharp bursts of exercise are no fad, researcher says | 1 NEWS


    Short bursts of intense exercise are not too good to be true when it comes to getting back into post Covid-19 lockdown shape.

    And it can help build a stronger, healthier heart.

    University of NSW Medicine exercise physiology researcher, Andrew Keech, says high-intensity interval training, known as HIIT, is far from a celebrity fad.

    Keech has studied the science of exercise for 20 years and says HIIT is superior to traditional moderate-intensity training, like a long slow jog.

    “HIIT is a fancy way of saying, ‘work hard for a while, recover and then do it all again’. This is what athletes have been doing for many years,” Keech says.

    He said research showed that HIIT was effective in improving aerobic fitness and conditions such as blood pressure, body fat levels and glucose control.

    “Even if you rarely exercise, it’s never too late to start doing HIIT,” Keech said.

    “When you

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    Short sharp bursts of exercise are no fad | The Canberra Times


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    Short bursts of intense exercise are not too good to be true when it comes to getting back into post COVID-19 lockdown shape. And it can help build a stronger, healthier heart. University of NSW Medicine exercise physiology researcher, Dr Andrew Keech, says high-intensity interval training, known as HIIT, is far from a celebrity fad. Dr Keech has studied the science of exercise for 20 years and says HIIT is superior to traditional moderate-intensity training, like a long slow jog. “HIIT is a fancy way of saying, ‘work hard for a while, recover and then do it all again’. This is what athletes have been doing for many years,” Dr Keech says. He said research showed that HIIT was effective in improving aerobic fitness and conditions such as blood pressure, body fat levels and glucose control. “Even if you rarely exercise, it’s never too late to start doing

    Read More