As virus spread worsens, NC is reluctant to add restrictions


RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) — As coronavirus trends continue to worsen, North Carolina’s top public health official reiterated Thursday the same messages of mask wearing, hand washing and physical distancing that have been promoted for months with mixed success.

“If we were all to follow the things that are currently in place right now, I don’t think we needed to do more (tightening of restrictions),” said Mandy Cohen, secretary of the state Department of Health and Human Services, during a Thursday news conference. “But we know that that is hard. We know that we are asking a lot of folks, and it may be possible that we need to go backwards.”

North Carolina on Thursday reported its highest single-day increase in coronavirus cases since the start of the pandemic, with more than 5,600 people testing positive for the coronavirus. The percentage of tests coming back positive also has risen sharply in

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FITNESS FILES: Yoga classes go back online with latest round of restrictions


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As far as Schmidt knows, there has not been a single case of transmission from her studio, so the latest rounds of restrictions did come as somewhat of a surprise.

All team sports, fitness classes and training sessions have been prohibited. Prior to the latest restrictions, yoga studios were adhering to stringent health guidelines.

“We were not touching each other, the instructors weren’t going around and doing any hands-on, and they were wearing a mask the whole time,” Schmidt said. “They’re safe and people are social distanced. I can understand some points because of the sizing, we’re not outdoors, but I was surprised, because I think most members of the health community are taking it seriously, they don’t want to be shutdown.

“The members and the instructors running it are trying to be extra cautious, because the instructors want to keep their jobs and the members don’t

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California hospitalizations soar, may spur more restrictions, Gov. Newsom warns


Gavin Newsom, governor of California, speaks during a news conference in Sacramento, California

Rich Pedroncelli | Bloomberg | Getty Images

California could see a tripling of hospitalizations by Christmas and is considering stay-home orders for areas with the highest case rates as it tries to head off concerns that severe coronavirus cases could overwhelm intensive care beds, officials said Monday.

“The red flags are flying in terms of the trajectory in our projections of growth,” said Gov. Gavin Newsom. “If these trends continue, we’re going to have to take much more dramatic, arguably drastic, action.”

Hospitalizations have increased 89% over the past 14 days and nearly 7,800 coronavirus patients were hospitalized as of Monday. About 12% of Californians testing positive are likely to need hospital care within the next two to three weeks.

The biggest concern is intensive care cases, which have increased 67% in the past two weeks. If

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California hospitalizations soar, may spur more restrictions


SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — California could see a tripling of hospitalizations by Christmas and is considering stay-home orders for areas with the highest case rates as it tries to head off concerns that severe coronavirus cases could overwhelm intensive care beds, officials said Monday.

“The red flags are flying in terms of the trajectory in our projections of growth,” said Gov. Gavin Newsom. “If these trends continue, we’re going to have to take much more dramatic, arguably drastic, action.”

Hospitalizations have increased 89% over the past 14 days and nearly 7,800 coronavirus patients were hospitalized as of Monday. About 12% of Californians testing positive are likely to need hospital care within the next two to three weeks.

The biggest concern is intensive care cases, which have increased 67% in the past two weeks. If that continues, it would push ICU beds to 112% of capacity by mid-December.


That statistic is

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No plans for more restrictions despite doctors’ plea


HARTFORD, Conn. (AP) — Connecticut has no plans at the moment to impose more restrictions on businesses amid rising coronavirus infections and deaths, despite a group of doctors calling for the closure of gyms and a pause on indoor dining to prevent hospitals from becoming overwhelmed, Gov. Ned Lamont said Monday.

The Democratic governor’s comments came as virus-related deaths in the state topped 5,000 since the pandemic began.

Last week, nearly three dozen doctors and a nurse sent a letter to Lamont and Dr. Deidre Gifford, the state’s public health commissioner, urging them to shut down gyms, ban indoor dining and prohibit unnecessary public gatherings to save lives and help hospitals avoid being overwhelmed by the second wave of the virus now hitting the state.

“Even though it is still early in the second wave, we are already spilling outside our ICUs, calling for extra volunteers, and we are exhausting

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Fauci says Christmas and New Year’s restrictions will be necessary


Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, wears a protective mask during a news conference in the White House in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Thursday, Nov. 19, 2020.

Chris Kleponis | Bloomberg | Getty Images

Dr. Anthony Fauci, the nation’s top infectious disease expert, said on Sunday that the U.S. is heading into a difficult period of the coronavirus pandemic and said current restrictions and travel advisories will be necessary for the Christmas holiday season.

“What we expect, unfortunately, as we go for the next couple of weeks into December, is that we might see a surge superimposed on the surge we are already in,” Fauci said in an interview with NBC’s “Meet the Press”. “I don’t want to frighten people, except to say it is not too late to do something about this.”

Fauci urged Americans to be careful as they return from Thanksgiving

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Travel recommendations, restrictions likely to extend through Christmas: Fauci


As the nation braces for what is likely to be the busiest travel day of the year amid a continued nationwide surge in coronavirus cases, Dr. Anthony Fauci said Sunday that he does not foresee current holiday public health restrictions and recommendations being relaxed by the end of the year.



Anthony S. Fauci wearing a suit and tie: National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases Director Dr. Anthony Fauci is reflected in a video monitor behind him on stage as he listens to the daily coronavirus task force briefing at the White House, April 8, 2020.


© Kevin Lamarque/Reuters. FILE
National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases Director Dr. Anthony Fauci is reflected in a video monitor behind him on stage as he listens to the daily coronavirus task force briefing at the White House, April 8, 2020.

“When you have the kind of inflection that we have, it doesn’t all of a sudden turn around like that,” said Fauci, the director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, on ABC’s “This Week.”

“Clearly in the next few weeks, we’re gonna have the same sort of thing,” he told “This Week” co-anchor Martha

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The Latest: Czechs Ease Virus Restrictions as Cases Decline | Oregon News


PRAGUE — The Czech government said Sunday it is easing measures imposed to contain the new coronavirus due to falling numbers of new confirmed cases.

Health Minister Jan Blatny said all stores, restaurants and bars can reopen on Thursday and a ban on Sunday sales is lifted.

Restaurants can be open 6 a.m. to 10 p.m., though they are limited to 50% of their capacity. Stores and shopping centers also must limit the number of customers.

Hair salons, fitness centers and gyms are allowed to reopen, as are zoos, museums and galleries.

The Czech Republic was among the hardest hit by a new wave of infections in the fall, but the number of new cases has been on a decline since Nov 4.

The country of almost 10.7 million had 518,649 confirmed cases with 8,054 fatalities. The day-to-day increase of new cases reached 2,667 on Saturday.

HERE’S WHAT YOU NEED

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Alberta fitness studios confused by COVID-19 restrictions on group classes, workouts


The Alberta government’s recent COVID-19 restrictions are impacting smaller fitness studios and many owners admit is a bit confusing.



Orange Theory Fitness ensures sanitization of all equipment.


© Jill Croteau/Global News
Orange Theory Fitness ensures sanitization of all equipment.

According to new health guidelines announced Tuesday, gyms all group classes aren’t allowed. Fitness studios, like Revive Lifestyle Fitness, can’t  do group training or semi-private training.  Owner Mike Du said they are only allowed to conduct one on ones, if a coach is involved.

Read more: The New Reality: The uncertain future of fitness studios

He says the problem is gyms can still have a group of members working out together, physically distanced. The trainer has to be kept outside the room. For Du, the logic doesn’t make sense.

“It’s hard for us to understand, part of it is about the coach pushing people in a way that’s high intensity and breathing hard,” Du said. “But there’s nothing stopping

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Lethbridge fitness studio offers rent-a-bike program during COVID-19 restrictions




a person sitting in front of a mirror posing for the camera: Kelleen Tait follows along with a virtual spin class at UNITE YQL during Alberta's second wave of COVID-19.


© Global News
Kelleen Tait follows along with a virtual spin class at UNITE YQL during Alberta’s second wave of COVID-19.

Kelleen Tait relies on her weekly workout sessions to keep grounded and manage her stress.

“During the first lockdown, I didn’t know what to do.”

With new Alberta gym capacity restrictions in place, she’s found a way to keep moving: a rent-a-bike program and virtual spin classes from local studio UNITE YQL.

Read more: Alberta enacts 2nd COVID-19 state of public health emergency. Here’s what it means

“It’s way harder than I would work out on my own and it really keeps me going,” Tait said.

For her, it’s not just about getting a sweat in. She says it allows her to still feel connected with instructors and a community she loves.

“As we’re all kind of shutting our doors and going into a bit more of an isolation

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