How the Pandemic Is Changing Our Diet and Exercise Habits, According to Research


Since the start of the pandemic has your lifestyle grown more or less healthy? I don’t know about you, but I know when I try to think through this question, the answer is complicated. 

Being stuck at home more means I cook more, which is probably a health win, but then I have to confess to enjoying more wine since this whole thing began too. I don’t go to the gym but I have started running more and squeezing in the odd online exercise class. My mental health is definitely down, but I am very fortunate to be able to say not dramatically. 

So do all these changes add up to a more or less healthy lifestyle? And am I typical? Are most of us reacting to work from home by cooking healthful meals and doing yoga, or binging on junk food and Netflix? Data is just starting to come

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The Latest: Birx Says Americans Must Be Strict for Pandemic | Utah News


UNITED NATIONS — The White House coronavirus response coordinator says Americans must not gather indoors with outsiders or take off their masks at any time when they are outdoors — even when they are eating and drinking.

Dr. Deborah Birx says people also have to observe social distancing and wash their hands to contain the coronavirus pandemic. She says some states are taking these measures, but in others it’s “not happening at the level that they need to happen.”

Birx says that even once vaccines are approved, it will take weeks to months before “the most vulnerable individuals in America” can be immunized.

She made the comments after meeting with U.N. Secretary-General Antonio Guterres and General Assembly President Volkan Bozkir at U.N. headquarters in New York on Thursday.

— U.S. reaches daily records with more than 3,100 deaths and 100,000 hospitalizations; tops 200,000 daily cases

— Russia vaccine available at

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Burnout at nursing homes is pandemic


And unlike the ambulance drivers and hospital workers who have struggled to save lives during the pandemic, many say they feel no love from the outside world. If a hospital was a home to heroes, a nursing home, in the popular imagination, seemed to have become a place where bodies were found stacked in a closet.

“The people in the community have no idea what we are going through,” said Rebecca Rufial, a licensed vocational nurse in Paris, Tex., who works a 12-hour shift every night, in charge of two halls with 40 to 50 patients, helped by two nursing assistants. “And no one cares, either.”

Allyson Stanton, a social worker in Howard County, Md., said, “It’s frustrating and sad — and overwhelming, because there’s just too much to take on.”

Staffers everywhere tell of fellow employees who have left their jobs out of anger, fear or illness. In late

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Birx says Americans must be strict for pandemic


UNITED NATIONS — The White House coronavirus response coordinator says Americans must not gather indoors with outsiders or take off their masks at any time when they are outdoors — even when they are eating and drinking.

Dr. Deborah Birx says people also have to observe social distancing and wash their hands to contain the coronavirus pandemic. She says some states are taking these measures, but in others it’s “not happening at the level that they need to happen.”

Birx says that even once vaccines are approved, it will take weeks to months before “the most vulnerable individuals in America” can be immunized.


She made the comments after meeting with U.N. Secretary-General Antonio Guterres and General Assembly President Volkan Bozkir at U.N. headquarters in New York on Thursday.

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THE VIRUS OUTBREAK:

— U.S. reaches daily records with more than 3,100 deaths and 100,000 hospitalizations; tops 200,000 daily cases

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How Iowa Mishandled the Coronavirus Pandemic


Democrats in Iowa believe that Reynolds’s inaction has always been about politics. Early on, she’d assumed an important role making sure that Trump would win Iowa in the November election, State Senator Joe Bolkcom, who represents Iowa City, told me. “She did that by making people feel comfortable” about going out to eat, going to bars, and going back to school. “She mimicked Trump’s posture” to get him elected. Ultimately, Reynolds was successful in her efforts: Trump won Iowa by 8 points. But Iowans lost much more.

Iowa’s problem is not that residents don’t want to do the right thing, or that they have some kind of unique disregard for the health of their neighbors. Instead, they looked to elected leaders they trust to tell them how to navigate this crisis, and those leaders, including Trump and Reynolds, told them they didn’t need to do much at all. (Although

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Vaccines offer hope for end to pandemic, but brutal months lie ahead


“The vaccine has not come in time to do much about the winter wave,” said Christopher Murray, director of the University of Washington’s Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation. “Vaccination is coming too late even if we do a really great job of scale-up. It’s coming too late to do much by March 1, or really by April 1.” Only at that point, he added, will the widespread distribution of vaccines begin to crush the virus.

In the meantime, the country faces what could turn out to be the most challenging few months in the public health history of the nation, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention director Robert Redfield warned in a speech Wednesday. That kind of dire language is increasingly coming from the top experts in the field and from the highest levels of the federal medical establishment. “We are in a very dangerous place,” declared a White

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The Darkest Stretch of the Pandemic Is Here


Today the United States blew by two grim pandemic milestones. The country recorded a record 195,695 coronavirus cases and reported 100,226 hospitalizations, passing the 100,000 mark for the first time, according to the COVID Tracking Project at The Atlantic. While the 2,733 deaths today did not break the all-time record, this was the first day since May with more than 2,500 deaths, as well as the day with the second-most deaths so far. (By The New York Times’ methodology, today’s was the highest daily coronavirus death toll on record.)



a group of people sitting in a chair


© Alex Edelman / Getty Images


These shocking numbers came on the same day that CDC Director Robert Redfield warned that this winter could be “the most difficult time in the public-health history of this nation” and as public-health experts await signs of a post-Thanksgiving surge. Some of today’s increase can be attributed to the numbers catching up after

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Exercise equipment a bright spot in the pandemic retail economy


Patrick Cooley
 
| The Columbus Dispatch

The Play It Again sporting goods store on Sawmill Road on the Northwest Side features a small space behind the register intended to mimic the free weight section of a neighborhood gym. A raised platform features a bench surrounded by racks of weights. 

Only one thing was missing on a recent Monday: the weights. One of the racks was bare while another displayed only two lonely mismatched barbells.

Husband-and-wife owners Marlene and Andy Demain said customers have been buying up free weights nearly as fast as the couple can stock them.

“We had to close on March 22nd” when Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine temporarily shuttered most non-essential businesses, Andy Demain said. “The week before that, every two minutes, someone was coming in the door or calling and asking about weights, and that never abated.”

Workout equipment is one bright spot in the coronavirus pandemic’s

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Exercising during the winter and pandemic


“Physical activity and exercise is probably the best medicine you can have,” Dr. Papuchis says.

WASHINGTON — The winter months often bring some of the laziest months for many Americans. The end of daylight-saving time can turn gym rats into couch potatoes. But with the ongoing coronavirus pandemic, flu season, and working from home, some challenges have been presented with staying active.

“Physical activity and exercise is probably the best medicine you can have for a variety of different issues, not just pain, but for cardiovascular health for longevity,” said Steven Papuchis, Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation.

Dr. Papuchis said this winter is not the time to be inactive when thinking of maintaining overall health. 

“This is kind of an almost two-pronged approach when we talk about exercise and how it helps fight off infections. Number one, exercise increases your blood, your body’s circulating white blood cells,

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Polish doctors fear high rate of positive COVID tests show pandemic worse than it appears


By Joanna Plucinska



a person riding on the back of a car: A staff member works at a mobile coronavirus disease (COVID-19) test centre in Warsaw


© Reuters/JAKUB STEZYCKI
A staff member works at a mobile coronavirus disease (COVID-19) test centre in Warsaw

WARSAW (Reuters) – Waldemar Witecki from the southwestern Polish town of Zagan was a healthy 64-year-old with no pre-existing conditions when he first developed a fever and chills around mid-October.

He was diagnosed with flu, even though he had come into contact with someone with COVID-19. He only get a test 10 days later, by which time he was critically ill. On Nov. 7, three weeks after first showing symptoms, he was dead.



a group of people in a room: A coronavirus disease (COVID-19) emergency workers train at the international industrial fair in Poznan


© Reuters/AGENCJA GAZETA
A coronavirus disease (COVID-19) emergency workers train at the international industrial fair in Poznan

Poland has one of the lowest testing rates in the European Union and one of the highest proportions of positive tests, which some doctors suggest means the pandemic may be far more widespread in the community than it appears.



a truck is parked on the side of a building: A temporary coronavirus disease (COVID-19) hospital at the International Congress Centre is pictured in Katowice


©

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