Newsom issues regional stay-at-home order based on ICU capacity to battle record Covid surge in California


Millions of Californians will likely find themselves under a regional stay-at-home order once again under new restrictions announced Thursday by Gov. Gavin Newsom.



a group of people in a room: FILE - In this Nov. 19, 2020, file photo, medical personnel prone a COVID-19 patient at Providence Holy Cross Medical Center in the Mission Hills section of Los Angeles. The raging coronavirus pandemic has prompted Los Angeles County to impose a lockdown to prevent the caseload from spiraling into a hospital crisis but the order stops short of a full business shutdown that could cripple the holiday sale season. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong, File)


© Jae C. Hong/AP
FILE – In this Nov. 19, 2020, file photo, medical personnel prone a COVID-19 patient at Providence Holy Cross Medical Center in the Mission Hills section of Los Angeles. The raging coronavirus pandemic has prompted Los Angeles County to impose a lockdown to prevent the caseload from spiraling into a hospital crisis but the order stops short of a full business shutdown that could cripple the holiday sale season. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong, File)

The new order will take hold in regions where hospitals are feeling the squeeze on capacity to treat the incoming surge of Covid-19 patients. A strict stay-at home order will go into effect 48 hours after hospital intensive care unit capacity drops below 15% in one of five regions

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Newsom reveals what California’s impending stay-at-home order will look like


California Gov. Gavin Newsom introduced Thursday the framework for a regional stay-at-home order, with the expectation that most of the state will fall under the more stringent requirement in days, with the Bay Area lagging a week or two behind. No regions have been placed into this regional stay-at-home order at this time.

Newsom said the state has created five regions by grouping counties based on hospital networks: Bay Area, Greater Sacramento, Northern California, San Joaquin Valley and Southern California.

Regions will be required to implement shutdown rules when intensive care unit capacity falls under 15%, and the governor said state projections show all regions except the Bay Area reaching this point in early December. It’s estimated the Bay Area will follow in mid- to late December.

Regions that fall under the stay-at-home order will have 48 hours to close several business sectors including bars, wineries, personal services, hair salons

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Gov. Newsom announces Calif. will receive 327,000 doses of coronavirus vaccine in December


Gov. Gavin Newsom suggested Monday the state could issue a new stay-at-home order for the majority of California’s counties as new coronavirus cases and hospitalizations surge across the state.

Coronavirus hospitalizations are on pace to rise by up to roughly 30 percent by Christmas Eve in much of the state, according to Newsom, as the state’s health care system absorbs a surge of new cases due in part to gatherings on Thanksgiving.

Intensive care units are also on track to reach and surpass 100 percent capacity some time in December in most of the state’s major population centers.


The Bay Area fares slightly better than other parts of the state in both of those metrics, with 58 percent of its hospital beds currently occupied and 62 percent projected to be occupied by Dec. 24.

Likewise, 72 percent of the Bay Area’s ICU beds are currently occupied, a figure projected to

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California hospitalizations soar, may spur more restrictions, Gov. Newsom warns


Gavin Newsom, governor of California, speaks during a news conference in Sacramento, California

Rich Pedroncelli | Bloomberg | Getty Images

California could see a tripling of hospitalizations by Christmas and is considering stay-home orders for areas with the highest case rates as it tries to head off concerns that severe coronavirus cases could overwhelm intensive care beds, officials said Monday.

“The red flags are flying in terms of the trajectory in our projections of growth,” said Gov. Gavin Newsom. “If these trends continue, we’re going to have to take much more dramatic, arguably drastic, action.”

Hospitalizations have increased 89% over the past 14 days and nearly 7,800 coronavirus patients were hospitalized as of Monday. About 12% of Californians testing positive are likely to need hospital care within the next two to three weeks.

The biggest concern is intensive care cases, which have increased 67% in the past two weeks. If

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Newsom suggests when mass vaccination could be available in California


With three COVID-19 vaccines now showing promising results, California Gov. Gavin Newsom said at a Monday press conference the state is preparing for delivery and distribution, but widespread availability to the public is still months away.

As Newsom has said before, he noted the state’s health care workers will be the first in line to receive inoculations and this could happen before the end of the year.

“Mass vaccination is unlikely to occur any time soon,” Newsom said. “March, April, June, July, that’s where we start to scale.”

The Food and Drug Administration is likely to approve one or more vaccines in early December, and Newsom said the state is ready to act quickly with the wheels already in motion.


California launched a community advisory committee of community groups, school leaders and nonprofit organizations to advise on distribution and allocation. A draft of the Phase 1a allocation, targeting 2.4 million

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Newsom describes quarantine situation during press conference from home



In this Oct. 7, 2020, file photo, California Gov. Gavin talks about the importance of wearing a face mask during a news conference at Sierra Orchards walnut farm in Winters, Calif.

In this Oct. 7, 2020, file photo, California Gov. Gavin talks about the importance of wearing a face mask during a news conference at Sierra Orchards walnut farm in Winters, Calif. | Renée C. Byer/The Sacramento Bee via AP, Pool, File

OAKLAND — A quarantining Gov. Gavin Newsom said Monday his home was sufficiently large and his circle insulated enough from outsiders for his family to wait out having been exposed to people that tested positive for coronavirus.

Nobody in Newsom’s family of six has tested positive, nor has a helper who has lived with the family for months, the governor said.

“I’m blessed because we have many rooms. I’m able to do this without kids jumping on top of me,” Newsom said in his first public remarks since his office revealed he had been exposed to the virus. Because of his quarantine, Newsom had to broadcast from his Sacramento

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