Vaccines offer hope for end to pandemic, but brutal months lie ahead


“The vaccine has not come in time to do much about the winter wave,” said Christopher Murray, director of the University of Washington’s Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation. “Vaccination is coming too late even if we do a really great job of scale-up. It’s coming too late to do much by March 1, or really by April 1.” Only at that point, he added, will the widespread distribution of vaccines begin to crush the virus.

In the meantime, the country faces what could turn out to be the most challenging few months in the public health history of the nation, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention director Robert Redfield warned in a speech Wednesday. That kind of dire language is increasingly coming from the top experts in the field and from the highest levels of the federal medical establishment. “We are in a very dangerous place,” declared a White

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Moderna COVID-19 Vax Produced Immune Responses for 4 Months


Antibody responses to Moderna’s COVID-19 vaccine candidate, mRNA-1273, remained strong for almost 4 months following vaccination, data from a phase I trial indicated.

Serum neutralizing antibodies were detected in 34 healthy adult volunteers at day 119 following the first dose, and 90 days following the second dose, reported Alicia Widge, MD, of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) in Bethesda, Maryland, and colleagues.

Moreover, both binding and neutralizing geometric mean titers exceeded those in 41 healthy controls who were recovering from COVID-19, the authors wrote in a Correspondence piece in the New England Journal of Medicine.

“Although correlates of protection against SARS-CoV-2 infection in humans are not yet established, these results show […] mRNA-1273 has the potential to provide durable humoral immunity,” the researchers wrote.

Importantly, they also found no new adverse events considered to be related to the vaccine after day 57.

Moderna recently made

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Scott Atlas resigns as Trump’s coronavirus adviser after months of feuding with administration health officials


Scott Atlas, President Trump’s pandemic adviser who embraced a controversial strategy of urging Americans to return to work and school with little restriction, and spent months feuding with the White House coronavirus task force’s other doctors, resigned on Monday, according to a letter he posted to his Twitter account.



a man wearing a suit and tie: Scott Atlas, White House coronavirus adviser, speaks during a news conference in September Photographer: Yuri Gripas/Abaca/Bloomberg


© Yuri Gripas/Bloomberg
Scott Atlas, White House coronavirus adviser, speaks during a news conference in September Photographer: Yuri Gripas/Abaca/Bloomberg

Atlas had become widely disliked in the White House — even among aides who shared his view that the country should reopen and that officials should not worry about young, healthy people contracting the virus, according to two senior administration officials, who spoke on the condition of anonymity to discuss personnel matters.

Atlas’s resignation was first reported by Fox News on Monday evening. The White House declined to comment.

Although Atlas, a neuroradiologist with no infectious-disease or public health background, fell

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Separated from loved ones for months, elderly face even lonelier holidays during the coronavirus pandemic


Elderly people in nursing homes and assisted living facilities around the country haven’t been able to hug a loved one in many months because of the coronavirus pandemic. Now, many are facing their first Thanksgiving and possibly Christmas without them.



a person in glasses looking at the camera: Grace Barnum


© CNN
Grace Barnum

“I’m just waiting,” Grace Barnum, 76, a resident at Beechwood Long Term Care in New London, Connecticut, said. Fighting back tears, she added: “To be able to hug again.”



a man sitting on a bed: Cathy Corey said about not seeing loved ones: "it's like my heart gets ripped out sometimes."


© CNN
Cathy Corey said about not seeing loved ones: “it’s like my heart gets ripped out sometimes.”

Nursing homes and other facilities for the elderly were hit hard early on in the pandemic because the virus is so deadly among that population. There have been more than 70,000 deaths in long-term care facilities, and though the people there account for only about 8% of coronavirus cases, they made up 45% of deaths by early September, according

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Nutrition portal to monitor services at anganwadis down for nearly three months


Snag comes amid rising levels of hunger and poverty. Some States have developed their own software modules

A massive nutrition portal developed by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation (BMGF), which is used by the Centre as well as most States, and touted as the world’s biggest nutrition system, to record and monitor delivery of services to children and mothers across nearly seven lakh anganwadis has been down for nearly three months, several State governments have confirmed.

The snag comes as a setback at a time there is a call for the need to intensify efforts to identify mothers and children in need of nutritional interventions due to rising levels of hunger and poverty. The software was developed under the Poshan Abhiyaan approved by the Cabinet in 2017 with a three-year budget of ₹9,000 crore, half of which was for ICT-based real-time monitoring system. While 50% of the amount is

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It takes six months to lose all your holiday weight. Here’s how to avoid gaining it instead.


Look, we all eventually succumb to the tantalizing aroma of warm stuffing; so savory and soft with just a hint of crunch. And even if stuffing’s not your thing, some other holiday treat will inevitably meet your lips. The season is filled with food, and our bellies are always a little rounder for it.



a piece of chocolate cake on a plate: Congratulations! This is a featured item on your new "diet."


© Provided by Popular Science
Congratulations! This is a featured item on your new “diet.”

While we’re gaining weight, it feels like it will be easy to lose it. Future you will be able to handle it, surely. Except here’s the truth: future you won’t lose that weight for at least six months (and don’t call me Shirley). You likely won’t get back to your lowest weight until fall of the following year, at which point you’ll proceed to gain it all back again.

And listen, this is not a pitch against eating. The decadent

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A new model projects Covid-19 cases in the US will nearly double over the next two months


Covid-19 is running unabated across almost every American community, and one model projects it will take the country just under two months to reach a staggering 20 million cases.



Mandatory Credit: Photo by Allen J Schaben/Los Angeles Times/Shutterstock (11014227b) 360 Clinic health care workers working with the Orange County Health Care Agency and city of Costa Mesa conducts testing at the drive-through self-administered COVID-19 testing super site at the Orange County Fair & Events Center on Thursday, Nov. 12, 2020 in Costa Mesa, CA. California is approaching 1 million cases, although the spread remains slower in the state than in other hot spots across the country. (Allen J. Schaben / Los Angeles Times) Covid Orange County, Orange County Fair & Events Center, Costa Mesa, California, United States - 12 Nov 2020


© Allen J Schaben/Los Angeles Time/Shutterstock
Mandatory Credit: Photo by Allen J Schaben/Los Angeles Times/Shutterstock (11014227b) 360 Clinic health care workers working with the Orange County Health Care Agency and city of Costa Mesa conducts testing at the drive-through self-administered COVID-19 testing super site at the Orange County Fair & Events Center on Thursday, Nov. 12, 2020 in Costa Mesa, CA. California is approaching 1 million cases, although the spread remains slower in the state than in other hot spots across the country. (Allen J. Schaben / Los Angeles Times) Covid Orange County, Orange County Fair & Events Center, Costa Mesa, California, United States – 12 Nov 2020

The US could nearly double its current numbers — about 12.4 million reported

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Illinois has worst COVID-19 week in months as deaths, hospitalizations continue rise


ABC News Corona Virus Government. Response

Illinois reported over 100 COVID-19 deaths for the fourth straight day Saturday.

Illinois reported over 100 COVID-19 deaths for the fourth day in a row and over 6,000 remain hospitalized for a third straight day on Saturday, adding up to its worst week during the pandemic since the spring.

The Illinois Department of Public Health reported 127 new deaths from the virus on Saturday, for the state’s deadliest week in six months. Since Nov. 15, more than 760 in Illinois have died from COVID-19, for a total of 11,430 since the start of the pandemic, state data shows.

There are a record 6,175 people hospitalized due to COVID-19 as reported on Saturday. Hospitalizations have been on a record-breaking streak since Nov. 11, when they surpassed a late-April peak, and have more than

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Coronavirus task force in first remarks in months notes rise in cases but expresses hope about vaccine


The White House’s Coronavirus Task Force made remarks to reporters for the first time since July on Thursday, as cases and deaths continue to climb, but took no questions. The U.S. has just passed the grim milestone of 250,000 deaths from COVID-19, with winter and the holidays are rapidly approaching.

The task force tried to balance emphasizing the need to remain vigilant, as cases rises, with hope as the vaccine comes online next month. Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar said “hope and help” are on the way. Vice President Mike Pence echoed a similar message. 

“We’re getting there, America,” he said. 

General Gustav Perna said once the Food and Drug Administration grants an emergency use authorization for a vaccine, the government would immediately begin distribution.

“It is this effort that I can look you in the face and say to you EUA comes, 24 hours later vaccines

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Coronavirus Immunity Might Last at Least 6 Months | Health News


By Robert Preidt, HealthDay Reporter

(HealthDay)

TUESDAY, Nov. 17, 2020 (HealthDay News) — Immunity to the new coronavirus may last six months or longer after people recover from infection, a new study suggests.

Researchers collected blood samples from 149 patients who had COVID-19 early in the pandemic and analyzed them for immune cells that make antibodies that block the SARS-CoV-2 virus from entering cells.

One month after infection, all of the patients had coronavirus-fighting antibodies. Six months after infection, those antibodies were more potent and better at fighting mutated versions of the virus.

The work, which was posted online Nov. 5 as a preprint to bioRxiv.org, hasn’t undergone peer review. Research is typically considered preliminary until it has been peer-reviewed.

The findings suggest that the immune systems of people who’ve been previously infected might be ready to combat the virus if they’re exposed again, according to the team at

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