Air Pollution Linked to Brain Amyloid Pathology


Higher levels of air pollution were associated with an increased risk for amyloid-beta pathology in a new study of older adults with cognitive impairment.



Dr Leonardo Iaccarino

“Many studies have now found a link between air pollution and clinical outcomes of dementia or cognitive decline,” lead author Leonardo Iaccarino, PhD, Weill Institute for Neurosciences, University of California, San Francisco, told Medscape Medical News. “But this study is now showing a clear link between air pollution and a biomarker of Alzheimer’s disease: it shows a relationship between bad air quality and pathology in the brain.

“We believe that exposure to air pollution should be considered as one factor in the lifetime risk of developing Alzheimer’s,” he added. “We believe it is a significant determinant. Our results suggest that if we can reduce occupational and residential exposure to air pollution, then this could help reduce the risk of Alzheimer’s.”

The study

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Study: Air pollution exposure may be linked to Alzheimer’s disease risk


Older adults exposed to air pollution might have a heightened risk of abnormal “plaque” accumulation in the brain, a new study suggests.

Plaques refer to clumps of protein called beta-amyloid that build up in the brains of people with Alzheimer’s disease.

In the new study, researchers found that among older adults with memory and thinking problems, those exposed to higher levels of air pollution were more likely to show plaque buildup on brain scans.

The findings do not prove air pollution causes plaques or dementia, said lead researcher Leonardo Iaccarino, a postdoctoral fellow at the University of California, San Francisco’s Memory and Aging Center.

But the results add to a body of research suggesting that air pollution is a risk factor for dementia.

A recent study, for example, found that older Americans living in polluted ZIP codes had higher odds of being hospitalized for dementia or Parkinson’s disease than people

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Type O blood linked to lower COVID risk, taking Vitamin D unlikely to help


(Reuters) – The following is a roundup of some of the latest scientific studies on the novel coronavirus and efforts to find treatments and vaccines for COVID-19, the illness caused by the virus.

FILE PHOTO: The ultrastructural morphology exhibited by the 2019 Novel Coronavirus (2019-nCoV), which was identified as the cause of an outbreak of respiratory illness first detected in Wuhan, China, is seen in an illustration released by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in Atlanta, Georgia, U.S. January 29, 2020. Alissa Eckert, MS; Dan Higgins, MAM/CDC/Handout via REUTERS

Certain blood groups less likely to get COVID-19

A large study adds to evidence that people with type O or Rh−negative blood may be at slightly lower risk from the new coronavirus. Among 225,556 Canadians who were tested for the virus, the risk for a COVID-19 diagnosis was 12% lower and the risk for severe COVID-19 or death

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Type O Blood Linked to Lower COVID Risk, Taking Vitamin D Unlikely to Help | Top News


(Reuters) – The following is a roundup of some of the latest scientific studies on the novel coronavirus and efforts to find treatments and vaccines for COVID-19, the illness caused by the virus.

Certain blood groups less likely to get COVID-19

A large study adds to evidence that people with type O or Rh−negative blood may be at slightly lower risk from the new coronavirus. Among 225,556 Canadians who were tested for the virus, the risk for a COVID-19 diagnosis was 12% lower and the risk for severe COVID-19 or death was 13% lower in people with blood group O versus those with A, AB, or B, researchers reported on Tuesday in Annals of Internal Medicine. People in any blood group who were Rh-negative were also somewhat protected, especially if they had O-negative blood. People in these blood type groups may have developed antibodies that can recognize some aspect of

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Exercise motivation could be linked to certain smells, mouse study finds


Sniffing your way to the gym
Exercise motivation could be linked to certain smells. Credit: Stan Lim, UC Riverside.

On a near daily basis, the internet spews out numerous tips and tricks for exercise motivation. Now we can add smell to the long and growing list.

A research team led by a scientist at the University of California, Riverside, has found olfaction—or smell—may play an important role in motivating mammals to engage in voluntary exercise.

Performed in lab mice, the study may open up new areas of research and have relevance for humans. Study results appear in PLOS ONE.

“Exercise, which is essential for both physical and mental health, can help prevent obesity and other inactivity-related diseases and disorders in humans,” said Sachiko Haga-Yamanaka, an assistant professor of molecular, cell and systems biology at UC Riverside and the study’s lead author. “Some people like to exercise more than others do, but why this is so

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Teen Suicide Rates Linked To Zinc Malnutrition; Nutrition Review Needed


New
Zealand has the highest teen suicide rate and the second
highest incidence of child obesity in the developed world
and it is long overdue for a national child nutrition
review, pharmaceutical scientist Sir Ray Avery
says.

Many countries around the world like New Zealand
and the USA face the combination of under-nutrition and
obesity due to fast food consumption.

This results in
people with obesity having micronutrient deficiencies,
leading to diseases such as type two diabetes and
cardiovascular disease, Avery says.

“One of these
linked overlaps is zinc deficiency. A complex, vicious cycle
of chronic disease and zinc deficiency often exists in the
same low-resource populations that preventive public health
and nutrition strategies frequently fail to reach,” he
says.

“New Zealand’s nutritional surveys conducted
in 2002 found zinc deficiencies were more common in Maori
and Pacific Island communities and

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Childhood lead exposure linked to lower IQ, reduced brain development in midlife, researchers find


Nov. 17 (UPI) — People exposed to lead during childhood shows signs of reduced brain development — and lower IQs — well into adulthood, a study published Tuesday by JAMA found.

The analysis of 564 adults with documented lead exposure at age 11 revealed that their IQ scores declined two points for every 5 micrograms per deciliter — a little over 3 ounces — of the substance in their blood, the data showed.

Study participants at age 11 years had an average of roughly 11 mcg. per deciliter of lead in their bloodstream, the researchers said. Lead levels of above 5 mcg. per deciliter are considered above normal, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

The lower IQ was attributed to lessened brain development caused by lead exposure, the researchers said.

“By now we know quite well that children exposed to lead experience disrupted brain development —

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Antibiotic use in babies linked to allergies, asthma and other conditions, study finds


Babies and toddlers who received one dose of antibiotics were more likely to have asthma, eczema, hay fever, food allergies, celiac disease, problems with weight and obesity and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder later in childhood, according to the study published Monday in Mayo Clinic Proceedings.

Multiple antibiotic treatments below the age of two was associated with a child having multiple conditions, the study found, with the illnesses differing due to the child’s gender, age, type of medication, dose and number of doses.

“We want to emphasize that this study shows association, not causation, of these conditions,” said senior study author Nathan LeBrasseur, a researcher at Mayo Clinic’s Center on Aging. “These findings offer the opportunity to target future research to determine more reliable and safer approaches to timing, dosing and types of antibiotics for children in this age group.”

Researchers analyzed data from over 14,500 children who are part of
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Weekly exercise linked to lower risk of Alzheimer’s disease in patients with mild cognitive impairment


Exercising more than once per week is associated with a lower risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease in patients with mild cognitive impairment, research published in the open access journal Alzheimer’s Research and Therapy suggests. Mild cognitive impairment is a condition that causes people to have more problems with memory and thinking than is normal for someone their age. People with mild cognitive impairment have a ten-fold higher risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease than the general population.

A team of researchers from Yonsei University College of Medicine, Republic of Korea, found that compared with people with mild cognitive impairment who did not exercise, those who carried out vigorous or moderate physical activity for at least ten minutes more than once per week had an 18% lower risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease. Among those who exercised more than once per week, people with mild

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A dozen sickened in E. coli outbreak linked to recalled romaine lettuce


Federal health officials are investigating whether an outbreak of E. coli that’s sickened 12 people in six states stems from recalled romaine lettuce sold by Tanimura & Antle across the country, including at more than 1,100 Walmart stores.

Five of those infected were hospitalized, and all of those stricken in the current outbreak showed the same strain of E. coli that prompted a recall last week by the Salinas, California-based produce company, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. No deaths have been reported.

The CDC announced its probe after routine sampling in Michigan flagged Tanimura & Antle lettuce as infected with E. coli.

The bacteria typically strikes three or four days after a person consumes food tainted with E. coli. Symptoms include severe stomach cramps, diarrhea, vomiting and fever, while some infected people can suffer from kidney failure.

Tanimura & Antle on Friday recalled nearly 3,400

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