AHA News: Eating Foods That Promote Inflammation May Worsen Heart Failure | Health News


By American Heart Association News, HealthDay Reporter

(HealthDay)

MONDAY, Nov. 30, 2020 (American Heart Association News) — People with heart failure who eat a diet high in foods that cause inflammation are twice as likely to end up in the hospital or die as those who eat foods known to reduce inflammation, new research shows.

“If people with heart failure can reduce the amount of pro-inflammatory foods that they eat, it might help with their survival,” said lead researcher JungHee Kang, a nursing research assistant and PhD student at the University of Kentucky in Lexington.

Diet has been shown to play a role in regulating inflammation, which is associated with many chronic illnesses, including heart disease. Diets high in foods such as red meat, refined grains and high-fat dairy products have been shown to increase inflammation, while foods such as olive oil, whole grains, and fruits and vegetables have been

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Nationally Known Dietitian, Nutrition Consultant and Author Offers Readers A Path to Reversing Chronic Inflammation


SAN ANTONIO, Texas, Nov. 17, 2020 (SEND2PRESS NEWSWIRE) — Jan Tilley, a nationally recognized dietitian specializing in chronic disease management, has just released a third book dedicated to helping those suffering with chronic inflammation. Entitled “Eat Well to Be Well: Living Your Best Life Through the Power of Anti-Inflammatory Food” (ISBN: 978-1626342668), the book summarizes the health risks so many face due to the fact the American diet has become completely unbalanced.

“I wrote this book prior to the COVID pandemic and recognize now how important the contents are as a resource to help people of all ages take practical steps to reduce inflammation. ‘Eat Well to Be Well’ offers readers a path to improved health by giving step-by-step guidance on how to maximize their health and avoid the compromised health issues associated with chronic inflammation. Those who read this book tell me it has been invaluable in guiding them

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Nationally Known Dietitian, Nutrition Consultant and Author Offers Readers A Path to Reversing Chronic Inflammation – Press Release


SAN ANTONIO, Texas, Nov 17, 2020 (SEND2PRESS NEWSWIRE) — Jan Tilley, a nationally recognized dietitian specializing in chronic disease management, has just released a third book dedicated to helping those suffering with chronic inflammation. Entitled “Eat Well to Be Well: Living Your Best Life Through the Power of Anti-Inflammatory Food” (ISBN: 978-1626342668), the book summarizes the health risks so many face due to the fact the American diet has become completely unbalanced.

“I wrote this book prior to the COVID pandemic and recognize now how important the contents are as a resource to help people of all ages take practical steps to reduce inflammation. ‘Eat Well to Be Well’ offers readers a path to improved health by giving step-by-step guidance on how to maximize their health and avoid the compromised health issues associated with chronic inflammation. Those who read this book tell me it has been invaluable in guiding them

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How to Reduce Inflammation to Lose Weight Faster


When trying to lose or manage weight, many people’s go-to solutions include trying things like counting calories or cutting out carbs. And while these methods may work for some people, unfortunately, it is not a one-size-fits-all solution.

Many may know that chronic inflammation is linked to outcomes like an increased risk of certain cancers and hypertension. But they may not realize that it can also be associated with weight gain. In fact, data suggests that as inflammatory markers in the blood increase, weight increases as well.

One reason why inflammation may be linked to weight gain is that chronic inflammation and insulin resistance appear to go hand-in-hand. And since insulin resistance can result in weight gain, the relationship between inflammation and weight status is apparent.

Compound the effects inflammation has on insulin with the effects it may have on leptin — a hunger hormone that helps the brain regulate how

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