Feeling Sore After Exercise? Here’s What Science Suggests Helps (And What Doesn’t)


The Conversation

Have you been hitting the gym again with COVID restrictions easing? Or getting back into running, cycling, or playing team sports?

As many of you might’ve experienced, the inevitable muscle soreness that comes after a break can be a tough barrier to overcome.

Here’s what causes this muscle soreness, and how best to manage it.

 

What is muscle soreness and why does it occur?

Some muscle soreness after a workout is normal. But it can be debilitating and deter you from further exercise. The scientific term used to describe these aches is delayed onset muscle soreness, or DOMS, which results from mechanical disruption of the muscle fibres, often called “microtears”.

This damage causes swelling and inflammation in the muscle fibres, and the release of substances that sensitise the nerves within the muscle, producing pain when the muscle contracts or is stretched.

This pain usually peaks 24-72 hours after exercise. The

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Feeling sore after exercise? Here’s what science suggests helps (and what doesn’t)


Have you been hitting the gym again with COVID restrictions easing? Or getting back into running, cycling, or playing team sports?

As many of you might’ve experienced, the inevitable muscle soreness that comes after a break can be a tough barrier to overcome.

Here’s what causes this muscle soreness, and how best to manage it.

What is muscle soreness and why does it occur?

Some muscle soreness after a workout is normal. But it can be debilitating and deter you from further exercise. The scientific term used to describe these aches is delayed onset muscle soreness, or DOMS, which results from mechanical disruption of the muscle fibres, often called “microtears”.

This damage causes swelling and inflammation in the muscle fibres, and the release of substances that sensitise the nerves within the muscle, producing pain when the muscle contracts or is stretched.

This pain usually peaks 24-72 hours after exercise. The

Read More

A new study found coronavirus may have been in the US in December. That doesn’t mean you’ll ever know if you had it then


A new study published Monday suggests the novel coronavirus was infecting people across the US as early as December — a month before the first person known to have been infected with coronavirus arrived in the US from China on January 15.



a person sitting on a bed: A lab technician sorts blood samples inside a lab for a COVID-19 vaccine study at the Research Centers of America (RCA) in Hollywood, Florida, on August 13, 2020.


© Chandan Khanna/AFP/Getty Images
A lab technician sorts blood samples inside a lab for a COVID-19 vaccine study at the Research Centers of America (RCA) in Hollywood, Florida, on August 13, 2020.

Researchers screened blood donations made in December and early January and found evidence of antibodies to the novel coronavirus in at least 84 samples from nine states — something that would suggest those people had been infected with coronavirus.

“These findings suggest that SARS-CoV-2 may have been introduced into the United States prior to January 19, 2020,” the researchers at the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Red Cross wrote in the

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Calorie Count: Eating Early Doesn’t Boost Weight Loss | Health News


By Steven Reinberg, HealthDay Reporter

(HealthDay)

TUESDAY, Nov. 10, 2020 (HealthDay News) — If you’re overweight, eating most of your calories early in the day won’t boost the benefit of a healthy diet, new research suggests.

In a 12-week study, 41 people ate the same healthy diet, but one group ate 80% of their calories before 1 p.m. and the other group ate 50% of their calories after 5 p.m.

All participants consumed the same prepared, healthy meals. Weight and blood pressure were measured at the beginning of the study, and again at four, eight and 12 weeks. The analysis found that people in both groups lost weight and had decreased blood pressure, regardless of when they ate.

“We have wondered for a long time if when one eats during the day affects the way the body uses and stores energy,” said researcher Dr. Nisa Maruthur. She’s an associate professor

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