Metabolic Health | Benefits of Short Bursts of Activity


  • According to new research published in the journal Circulation, short bursts of activity, as little as 12 minutes, can improve your metabolic health.
  • You don’t necessarily have to go full-out to get these health benefits, either. You can start your rides or workouts easy and gradually build up the intensity.

    Let’s say you’re looking to improve your metabolic health—a.k.a., your normal blood sugar, triglyceride, HDL (good) cholesterol, and blood pressure numbers—so you hop on your bike. How long do you need to ride before you kickstart those benefits?

    A new study published in the journal Circulation suggests it may be shorter than you think.

    Sign up for Bicycling All Access to become a stronger, healthier rider!

    Researchers drew on data from the Framingham Heart Study on 411 middle-aged men and women, looking at levels of 588 circulating metabolites—substances produced during metabolism, such as amino acids, fatty acids, lipids, carbohydrates,

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    Quick Bursts of Exercise Can Help Diabetics’ Hearts | Health News


    (HealthDay)

    THURSDAY Nov. 26, 2020 (HealthDay News) — Frequent, short exercise sessions may be better for diabetes patients’ blood vessels than longer and fewer workouts, and that may reduce their risk of heart disease, according to a new study.

    People with type 2 diabetes are at increased risk for heart disease and reduced vascular (blood vessel) function, the study authors noted. Measuring vascular function is often used to determine heart disease risk.

    Other research has shown that spending less time sitting and getting more exercise lowers the risk of heart disease in all people, not just those with diabetes.

    But with “rapidly advancing technologies in workplaces, transportation and home entertainment, fewer opportunities exist for incidental activity, creating many contexts of daily life that are conducive to prolonged sitting,” according to the report published online recently in the American Journal of Physiology-Heart and Circulatory Physiology.

    Frances Taylor, a doctoral candidate

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    Quick bursts of exercise can help diabetics’ hearts


    Quick bursts of exercise can help diabetics' hearts

    (HealthDay)—Frequent, short exercise sessions may be better for diabetes patients’ blood vessels than longer and fewer workouts, and that may reduce their risk of heart disease, according to a new study.

    People with type 2 diabetes are at increased risk for heart disease and reduced vascular (blood vessel) function, the study authors noted. Measuring vascular function is often used to determine heart disease risk.

    Other research has shown that spending less time sitting and getting more exercise lowers the risk of heart disease in all people, not just those with diabetes.

    But with “rapidly advancing technologies in workplaces, transportation and home entertainment, fewer opportunities exist for incidental activity, creating many contexts of daily life that are conducive to prolonged sitting,” according to the report published online recently in the American Journal of Physiology-Heart and Circulatory Physiology.

    Frances Taylor, a doctoral candidate in exercise and sports science at Australian Catholic

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    Harvard study finds big benefits to 12-minute bursts of exercise


    A new study from the Harvard-affiliated Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) has been published, and it found short bursts of physical exercise can have a significant impact on health. The research team describes in their paper that about 12 minutes of acute cardiopulmonary exercise affected more than 80 percent of circulating metabolites. Short bursts of exercise also impacted pathways linked to a wide range of favorable health outcomes identifying potential mechanisms that might contribute to a better understanding of cardiometabolic benefits of exercise.

    Gregory Lewis, section head of Heart Failure at MGH and the senior author of the study, said that it was striking to the researchers that the effects of a brief bout of exercise have on circulating levels of metabolites that govern vital body functions. Functions linked to those metabolites include insulin resistance, oxidative stress, vascular reactivity, inflammation, and longevity. The study drew data from the Framingham Heart Study

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    Short exercise bursts produce “striking” effects on metabolic health


    That regular exercise promotes good health is a given, but lately scientists are beginning to unearth some of the intricate mechanisms behind this relationship. A new study has shone a light on short bursts of vigorous exercise specifically, finding that they can produce “striking” effects on the metabolites circulating through the body and by extension lead to improvements in a wide range of bodily functions.

    From boosting the body’s ability to attack cancer, to enhancing learning, and protecting against Alzheimer’s and dementia, recent research is continuing to show us just how far-reaching the benefits of regular exercise can be. The new study carried out by scientists at Massachusetts General Hospital sought to explore how it affects metabolic function, and the knock-on effects of health more generally.

    “Much is known about the effects of exercise on cardiac, vascular and inflammatory systems of the body, but our study provides a comprehensive look

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    Short bursts of intense exercise could help people get fit in time for summer


    Short bursts of intense exercise – known as HIIT – could help you get back into shape by summer and stay that way, a UNSW Sydney exercise physiology researcher says.

    Short bursts of intense exercise could help people get fit in time for summer

    Running up an incline like a staircase is one example of doing HIIT – high-intensity interval training. UNSW Medicine researcher Dr Andrew Keech runs uphill near his home and says it’s a great, efficient way to keep fit. Photo: Shutterstock

    Getting fit by exercising intensely for a few minutes a day, several times a week, might sound too good to be true if COVID-19 lockdown has left you with an expanded waistline.

    And with the coming and going of exercise trends with catchy names and celebrity endorsements, it would be easy to dismiss high-intensity interval training (HIIT) as just another fad.

    But it’s far from it and could be your answer to getting back into shape in

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    Short bursts of exercise elicit widespread changes in the body’s levels of metabolites


    Short bursts of physical exercise induce changes in the body’s levels of metabolites that correlate to, and may help gauge, an individual’s cardiometabolic, cardiovascular and long-term health, a study by Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) has found. In a paper published in Circulation, the research team describes how approximately 12 minutes of acute cardiopulmonary exercise impacted more than 80% of circulating metabolites, including pathways linked to a wide range of favorable health outcomes, thus identifying potential mechanisms that could contribute to a better understanding of cardiometabolic benefits of exercise.

    Much is known about the effects of exercise on cardiac, vascular and inflammatory systems of the body, but our study provides a comprehensive look at the metabolic impact of exercise by linking specific metabolic pathways to exercise response variables and long-term health outcomes. What was striking to us was the effects a

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    Short sharp bursts of exercise are no fad, researcher says | 1 NEWS


    Short bursts of intense exercise are not too good to be true when it comes to getting back into post Covid-19 lockdown shape.

    And it can help build a stronger, healthier heart.

    University of NSW Medicine exercise physiology researcher, Andrew Keech, says high-intensity interval training, known as HIIT, is far from a celebrity fad.

    Keech has studied the science of exercise for 20 years and says HIIT is superior to traditional moderate-intensity training, like a long slow jog.

    “HIIT is a fancy way of saying, ‘work hard for a while, recover and then do it all again’. This is what athletes have been doing for many years,” Keech says.

    He said research showed that HIIT was effective in improving aerobic fitness and conditions such as blood pressure, body fat levels and glucose control.

    “Even if you rarely exercise, it’s never too late to start doing HIIT,” Keech said.

    “When you

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    Bursts of exercise can lead to significant improvements in indicators of metabolic health


    exercise
    Credit: CC0 Public Domain

    Short bursts of physical exercise induce changes in the body’s levels of metabolites that correlate to, and may help gauge, an individual’s cardiometabolic, cardiovascular and long-term health, a study by Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) has found. In a paper published in Circulation, the research team describes how approximately 12 minutes of acute cardiopulmonary exercise impacted more than 80% of circulating metabolites, including pathways linked to a wide range of favorable health outcomes, thus identifying potential mechanisms that could contribute to a better understanding of cardiometabolic benefits of exercise.

    “Much is known about the effects of exercise on cardiac, vascular and inflammatory systems of the body, but our study provides a comprehensive look at the metabolic impact of exercise by linking specific metabolic pathways to exercise response variables and long-term health outcomes,” says investigator Gregory Lewis, MD, section head of Heart Failure at MGH and senior

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    Short sharp bursts of exercise are no fad | The Canberra Times


    news, latest-news

    Short bursts of intense exercise are not too good to be true when it comes to getting back into post COVID-19 lockdown shape. And it can help build a stronger, healthier heart. University of NSW Medicine exercise physiology researcher, Dr Andrew Keech, says high-intensity interval training, known as HIIT, is far from a celebrity fad. Dr Keech has studied the science of exercise for 20 years and says HIIT is superior to traditional moderate-intensity training, like a long slow jog. “HIIT is a fancy way of saying, ‘work hard for a while, recover and then do it all again’. This is what athletes have been doing for many years,” Dr Keech says. He said research showed that HIIT was effective in improving aerobic fitness and conditions such as blood pressure, body fat levels and glucose control. “Even if you rarely exercise, it’s never too late to start doing

    Read More