Air Pollution Linked to Brain Amyloid Pathology


Higher levels of air pollution were associated with an increased risk for amyloid-beta pathology in a new study of older adults with cognitive impairment.



Dr Leonardo Iaccarino

“Many studies have now found a link between air pollution and clinical outcomes of dementia or cognitive decline,” lead author Leonardo Iaccarino, PhD, Weill Institute for Neurosciences, University of California, San Francisco, told Medscape Medical News. “But this study is now showing a clear link between air pollution and a biomarker of Alzheimer’s disease: it shows a relationship between bad air quality and pathology in the brain.

“We believe that exposure to air pollution should be considered as one factor in the lifetime risk of developing Alzheimer’s,” he added. “We believe it is a significant determinant. Our results suggest that if we can reduce occupational and residential exposure to air pollution, then this could help reduce the risk of Alzheimer’s.”

The study

Read More

Study: Air pollution exposure may be linked to Alzheimer’s disease risk


Older adults exposed to air pollution might have a heightened risk of abnormal “plaque” accumulation in the brain, a new study suggests.

Plaques refer to clumps of protein called beta-amyloid that build up in the brains of people with Alzheimer’s disease.

In the new study, researchers found that among older adults with memory and thinking problems, those exposed to higher levels of air pollution were more likely to show plaque buildup on brain scans.

The findings do not prove air pollution causes plaques or dementia, said lead researcher Leonardo Iaccarino, a postdoctoral fellow at the University of California, San Francisco’s Memory and Aging Center.

But the results add to a body of research suggesting that air pollution is a risk factor for dementia.

A recent study, for example, found that older Americans living in polluted ZIP codes had higher odds of being hospitalized for dementia or Parkinson’s disease than people

Read More

Could Dirty Air Help Speed Alzheimer’s? | Health News


By Amy Norton HealthDay Reporter

(HealthDay)

TUESDAY, Dec. 1, 2020 (HealthDay News) — Older adults exposed to air pollution might have a heightened risk of abnormal “plaque” accumulation in the brain, a new study suggests.

Plaques refer to clumps of protein called beta-amyloid that build up in the brains of people with Alzheimer’s disease. In the new study, researchers found that among older adults with memory and thinking problems, those exposed to higher levels of air pollution were more likely to show plaque buildup on brain scans.

The findings do not prove air pollution causes plaques or dementia, said lead researcher Leonardo Iaccarino, a postdoctoral fellow at the University of California, San Francisco’s Memory and Aging Center.

But the results add to a body of research suggesting that air pollution is a risk factor for dementia.

A recent study, for example, found that older Americans living in polluted ZIP codes

Read More

US Air Force prepares for its first information warfare exercise


WASHINGTON — The U.S. Air Force is gearing up for its first information warfare-focused exercise next year.

At a newly created information warfare training facility in Playas, New Mexico, the Air Force is planning what it calls an information warfare flag in spring 2021, Lt. Gen. Chris Weggeman, deputy commander of Air Combat Command, said during a virtual conference Nov. 17 hosted by AFCEA’s Alamo chapter.

The Air Force’s training events are called flags; Red Flag is its premier air-to-air training exercise.

In October 2019, the service created 16th Air Force, its first information warfare-focused entity, combining capabilities from numbered Air Forces to fuse capabilities related to cyberspace, electromagnetic spectrum operations, information operations, intelligence gathering and weather.

Weggeman said the information warfare flag will involve “live fire and live fly.” The new training facility will also provide these live services and will aim to refine information warfare tactics, such as

Read More

Air Force, Navy, Marines participate in joint exercise over Indo-Pacific


Nov. 17 (UPI) — A B-1B Lancer participated in a joint interoperability exercise in the Indo-Pacific Region last week, the Air Force announced.

According to the Air Force, a B-1B assigned to the 34th Bomb Squadron at Ellsworth Air Force Base in South Dakota integrated with the 9th Expeditionary Bomb Squadron at Dyess AFB in Texas — currently deployed to Guam — along with other members of the Air Force, Navy and Marines.

The mission lasted about 25 hours and focused on operational-level, joint force movements, specifically involving defense of high value assets, maritime interdiction and airfield seizure.

“Scenarios like these help increase our lethality, readiness, joint force integration, flexibility and agility that can be used in any real-world scenario,” U.S. Air Force Lt. Col. Ryan Stallsworth, 9th EBS commander, said in a statement.

“We also had B-1 assets from the continental U.S. participating in the exercise, which demonstrated our

Read More

India coronavirus: How air pollution is making Delhi’s covid surge worse


Sarkar’s son and older brother were both infected with the novel coronavirus. Although her son recovered, her brother died in October. This year is “particularly frightening,” she said.

Delhi is battling both toxic air and a record surge in coronavirus cases. Doctors and scientists say the combination will have deadly consequences, as exposure to pollution increases the risk of severe respiratory illnesses. Air pollution also makes people more prone to infections, they say.

India has recorded more than 8.7 million coronavirus cases, second only to the United States. While fresh cases nationwide have fallen sharply since September, Delhi is an exception to the trend.

The city is adding more than 7,000 cases a day, and that figure is expected to rise. More than 100 covid deaths were reported in Delhi on Thursday, a record. Meanwhile, the number of open hospital beds equipped with ventilators is dwindling.

The fresh wave of

Read More

The Latest: Hong Kong, Singapore Plan ‘Air Travel Bubble’ | World News


HONG KONG — Hong Kong and Singapore will establish an “air travel bubble” Nov. 22 allowing travelers from the two cities to visit the other without having to serve quarantine in a first step to stimulate tourism amid the coronavirus pandemic.

Under the plan, tourists from either city must take nucleic acid tests before their flight, after arrival and before their return to prove they do not have the coronavirus.

They will also have to take designated flights that will carry only passengers travelling within the bubble, with a maximum of 200 travelers. Initially, there will be one flight a day to each city, increasing to two flights after Dec. 7.

Officials say the system will be suspended for two weeks if either Hong Kong or Singapore reports a seven-day moving average of more than five untraceable coronavirus infections.

HERE’S WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT THE VIRUS OUTBREAK:

Read More